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Codes of The Flux

By May 21, 2020 No Comments

Codes of The Flux:

Hey all

Been a while since our last updates and as the whole world knows by now: things done changed.

With this global pandemic named COVID 19 underway we cancelled or postponed many of the projects we were working on such as the regular Wavey Lines life drawing sessions and a few of the festivals we are involved in have also been postponed.

Not wanting anyone to become ill under our watch has other angles to consider.

One of those angles is a project by the name Codes of The Flux. This in turn is being over-arched by Slanguages which is based out of Birmingham City University and is the brainchild of one Rajinder Dudrah. Slanguages produces work based on and looking at language in the aspect of Multilinguilism. So far this has included works with Yoruba, Sign-Language, Patois, Urdu, Arabic and even Russian.

So in this team up, Afroflux and it’s many creative collaborators are flexing our flex muscles on the things we best bring to the table. Afroflux is all about the mix and ever changing blend of Art, Music, Comics, Zines, Illustration, Dance, Rap and the how and the why of where and when they overlap and work together. We take our zero point from the lesser known perspectives of Black and brown peoples worldwide. Often there will be educational or STEM strands in our works but first and foremost it’s about real lived experiences, practical applications and the casting of futurities.

Over the course of our respective lockdowns, quarantines and keywork we will be presenting a zine, conversations, music and writings all dealing with Code Switching.

Code Switching is the phrase for whenever a person feels compelled to change speech patterns, body language or even tonality to fit in. Most humans do this in some form or another but this phenomena specifically affects Black, brown, poor and immigrant people in professional settings such as the workplace or education. The lower down the social scale the person is seen as being tends to be the more that they will have to Code Switch.

With Codes of The Flux we take particular looks at the phenomena with a few online conversations from Black and brown folks in their respective working lives and environments, a Rap song that flows through South Asian language and dialect as they relate to living in modern Britain, Black cosplayers and Anime fans dealing with being into ‘white people’s things’ and a few more surprises.

As Europe has been so affected by the virus over the last few months, it’s taken a longer while to gather ourselves with each twist in the narrative and so many Black and brown people being infected.

Needs must and with that in mind please get as much natural Sun, minerals, vitamins, water and fresh air as allowed using the safest methods for self and others.

Check out our short series of online meetups with creators in the Midlands, Singapore, Miami and more as the clock reveals

“Codes of The Flux – Up to di time

Much has been spoken of in recent times in regard to ‘Codeswitching’, the ability to go between native languages/accents and those that are needed for so-called professional means in a corporate ‘white’ world.

At AfroFlux this is a thing that we have been looking at for sum time.

In fact, it’s a thing we have been living all of our lives.

So in this mode we present an exploration of times/moments where our ability to switch codes is and has been needed, but go a touch deeper.

The depth is found in how the Fluxcode changes from moment to moment and even in the differing types of Blackness.

The raised voice of praise at church to the bass heavy tones of road life.

With the rise of the Black and brown gamer and cosplayer, what does Blackness mean in an environ where it’s seemingly standard to present as East Asian?

Or do they?

Who codes and when does the code get switched?”

 

Keep up to the time with us for a series of interesting takes on Code Switching under quarantine.

 

slanguages

 

Afroflux

Author Afroflux

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